SL 765

Students are running “side hustles” to afford college. I’ve heard tales about students at NYU doing sex work on the side, but never talked to one of those students. I think it would be a good story. Anyway, a study coming out of the UK said those numbers are rising.

Cranberry pointed us to a new law coming out of CA that puts limits on freelance writing. It wouldn’t impact me, since it takes so freaking long to write my type of articles, but I appreciate that legislators are keeping an eye on it.

Is Warren in a health policy trap?

I have to admit that I’m reading all the stories about Harry, Meghan, and the tabloids. I have to admit that I’m reading all the stories about Harry, Meghan, and the tabloids. One trashy website speculated that the Royal Family Business is purposely drumming up this story to distract from stories about Prince Andrew and Epstein.

Other guilty pleasure? Reading about rich people who have trouble paying their bills.

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13 thoughts on “SL 765

  1. “I’ve heard tales about students at NYU doing sex work on the side, but never talked to one of those students. I think it would be a good story”
    Serious click bait that has been done more than it should. Isn’t the preferred method to have a more regular, less transactional version of sex work? (I encountered the concept in the book “Post Grad”, which made me disappointed in the elite college women of today). Atlantic article on the book: https://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2017/04/post-grad-princeton-caroline-kitchener/521859/

    Saw that Dennis Quaid is marrying a 27 year old PhD student (in accounting, UT Austin, GMAT of 720, which is apparently the “cutoff” for the M7, yes, I googled). My main thought was how a 27 year old could find a man 40 years older than her attractive.

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  2. I’ve always very much enjoyed money diaries. The tidbit in the Atlantic article from Refiner29, that people enjoy reading the most the 6 figure income money diaries (though I hate that phrase, no one says “5 figure salaries”, and 150K is a totally different income than 950K). And, the link to the NY Times article, on a 2014 survey, showing the relationship between the income people make & what they think it means to be rich (120K (501K)).

    The NY Times article talks about how differently people react to a tax that applies generically to “rich” people v one that’s linked to an income level (in 2014, that was 200K).

    Seems like a current conversation — a twitter link that’s circulating in my feed is a Fox clip in which someone questions whether the wealth tax (applying to wealth over 50M) applies to “rich” people (because, actually, 50 million in assets is not rich).

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      1. Mostly what I see is that elderly people who watch daytime TV are very afraid of anti-Trump protestors and deferred car maintenance.

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    1. My formatting got messed up on the relationship between how much people make & what they think rich. People who make under 25K think 226K (10x their income) is rich. People who make more than 120K think 500K is rich.

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    1. Which would be when he was her age. They suggested that she could explain tik tok to him. Is that true? do 26 year olds watch tik tok? I thought it was teenagers.

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  3. Don’t most college students have part-time jobs? I did. (Sad to say, it involved not sex work, but typesetting for the college newspaper.)

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    1. y81 said,

      “(Sad to say, it involved not sex work, but typesetting for the college newspaper.)”

      I’m imagining a younger y81 stripping out of a firefighter costume while reciting classic poetry…

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    2. The article is interesting because it’s British — and, I think, it involves “side hustles”.The article’s first profile was a grad student in Britain, so I think this kind of trend is one that would have to be parsed carefully.

      In the US, I don’t think there are clear trends in employment, though how part and full time students and grad students are counted would make a difference. In the NCES report below, 43% of full time undergraduate students are reported as employed (in 2017; in 2005, it was 50%).

      https://nces.ed.gov/programs/coe/pdf/coe_ssa.pdf

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