SL 660

Helicopter parents make their college kids depressed says Slate. Or maybe it’s that depressed/sensitive kids cause parents to be involved. The article doesn’t even bother to throw that out as a possibility. Writers, please entertain all alternative theories.

College should do more for first generation students.

Syracuse has a whole lotta administrators.

Rich kids major in English.

My son accuses me of overusing the eyeroll. I’m eyerolling in the general direction of Greece right now.

How can I be so safe in my little suburban house with a Subaru out front, when there’s stuff like this is going on in the world?

Sean Parker was depicted as being a slimy dude in the move, “Social Network”. In real life, he just sounds like an asshole.

4 thoughts on “SL 660

  1. I wish the helicopter parents of the more privileged kids would spend a little less time on them and step in and help out the first generation college students.

    That F&M program sounds great. I wish there were more money for programs like that. They are expensive to run and unfortunately the public universities that those students would probably feel comfortable attending have less and less funding. So we have to attract the students that pay more (international students are an especially hot commodity now – and I’m afraid my use of economic language to describe them may capture the mercenary attitude among some administrators).

  2. Laura said:

    “Helicopter parents make their college kids depressed says Slate. Or maybe it’s that depressed/sensitive kids cause parents to be involved. The article doesn’t even bother to throw that out as a possibility. Writers, please entertain all alternative theories.

    “College should do more for first generation students.”

    Because first generation students don’t have helicopter parents managing them?

    Which is it, article writers–is hovering and managing good or bad?

    1. I don’t think that first generation students lack helicopter parents so much as the parents don’t know where to steer their kid whether they helicopter or take a more hands-off approach.

  3. The range of support students get from their parents is incredibly wide. I am sure I have students whose parents have no idea what classes they are taking in a given semester, and students whose parents write their papers for them. (This actually happens, though I hope not that often. One of my colleagues caught her student plagiarizing and he defended himself by saying his mother had written it.) There are students whose parents push them into majoring or minoring in their preferred field, and even taking specific courses, and there are students whose parents have no idea when registration is, when fees are due, etc. Some students call their parents as soon as they get out of a test to report on how they did (another one of the evils of cell phones, the expectation that you will talk to your parents every day!); others never talk to their parents about any of the work they are doing.

    So there’s definitely a good middle ground. A parent who can say, hey, maybe you should think about dropping that class that you’re failing (or going to talk to the teacher), or ask, how’s that big research paper going? – this is a good thing. Not everyone will have that, and that’s okay. This is a far cry from the parent who calls the teacher or edits the paper themselves.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s