Medicaid Pirates

JpHOMES-articleLarge The New York Times's front page story on the Levy brothers' abuse of the Medicaid system is going to have a long lasting and horrific impact on the developmentally disabled. 

The Levy brothers run a non-profit organization, Young Adult Institute Network, that helps developmentally disabled individuals. Unlike other institutions that have been exposed for abusing their patients, this group has attracted top professionals and patients have been well cared for. 

However, the Levy brothers have made themselves rich in the process. They have multiple homes, million dollars salaries, luxury cars and free tuition for their children — paid for in part with government dollars. 

How did this happen? The reporter blames the state for inadequate oversight. Also, I'm sure that the Levy's rationalized their salaries and compensation, because private health care administrators are paid quite well. 

This story is going to have a devastating impact on services. Services for the developmentally disabled, especially adults, are already substandard. We're in a political environment that would happily stop providing these services all together. The results will be more abuse in state run institutions and more disabled adults living with exhausted family members. 

Thank you, Levy brothers! 

4 thoughts on “Medicaid Pirates

  1. People who do a good job running multimillion operations should 1) make REALLY good money 2) have ferocious state auditors looking through their books 3) pay their own personal expenses out of their own ample salaries.
    This is only half a scandal. A whole scandal would be giving lousy care and ripping off the state, too.

  2. “A whole scandal would be giving lousy care and ripping off the state, too.”
    Yes. I didn’t know what to make out of the article, because the bottom line is that the people are being served well (it seems, though I’d want to see more investigation, since lack of oversight and a desire for personal enrichment could result in the cutting of corners that impact care, as well).
    If they’re being served well, then we have 1) excess pay for executives and 2) gaming of rules to increase payments, crossing over, in the examples given into fraud — lying about qualifications but potentially just gaming — reporting visual difficulties and 3) lack of oversight (which is always a bad thing).

  3. Why don’t we see articles like this for drug co execs or student loan co execs? It seems the interest here is “handouts” for the poor and disabled, not simply 2 guys who run a co and make money from govt funds.

  4. “Why don’t we see articles like this for drug co execs or student loan co execs? It seems the interest here is “handouts” for the poor and disabled, not simply 2 guys who run a co and make money from govt funds.”
    The Levys were running a non-profit, so it’s not really comparable to a drug company or a student loan-providing bank.

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