Swagger Wagon

Here's more suburban mommy-rap:

19 thoughts on “Swagger Wagon

  1. I love this commercial and am definitely in the target demographic. The whole campaign is focused on the uncool factor of the minivan, which is such an appropriate focus. I love it; thanks for sharing.

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  2. That’s a very funny clip but it drives me CRAZY how the minute anyone I know starts considering buying a minivan (for a family with 2 or fewer kids) the conversation devolves into “Oh, don’t worry about the COOL factor, it’s so comfy and convenient, just embrace your inner suburbanite” as if those are the key differentiators, and it becomes impossible to even discuss why you need to buy a vehicle that eats gas and seats 6 or 7 people for a family of four.

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  3. “it becomes impossible to even discuss why you need to buy a vehicle that eats gas and seats 6 or 7 people for a family of four. ”
    Well the reasons are 1) carpools. I can transport nearly half our GS troop in my minivan. People with 4 seaters can only transport 2 (especially with the booster seat issues). 2) the sliding doors. They’re really fabulous.
    But, if you never carpool (i.e. don’t regularly transport 5+driver in your car), then it’s only the sliding doors, and they’re probably not worth it. Our minivan drives 6+ people for about 120 miles/week. So calculate the gas cost, we’d have to compare the 120 miles w/ 1 car (versus 2) against the loss in mileage for the 1 big car driven 120 miles at the lower gas mileage). I think we come out ahead, though I need to actually check real miles w/ # of people in the car. That’ll be a project for next week.
    Oh and the carpooling doesn’t include the savings of driver time of having one driver instead of 2 or the other non-tangible benefits.

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  4. PS: My family does only contain 4 people but our car capacity benefits is increased by 1) grandparents who live nearby 2) the GS troop and associated carpooling 3) a drive to a school, in which we carpool 4) friends who live all over the city (see, private school, not in the neighborhood).

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  5. Carpooling is key. With 3 years between the kids, I wouldn’t be able to take any other children in my car. My minivan doesn’t require more gas than an SUV, which was the other option we were looking at. And those doors, as BJ pointed out, are AMAZING.

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  6. I used to ride home from school with the neighbor. He’d take 6 kids and himself in a standard sized pick-up. He’d let his youngest sit on his lap and steer.

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  7. Did you ride in the back, MH? I suspect that riding in the back of pickups is one more joy of childhood last these days, all for fear of being thrown out and horribly maimed or killed.

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  8. My favorite clip in this campaign, which is impossible to find online, is the one that starts with the father saying, “Who says having kids means you can’t have nice things?”. It then cuts to him hanging out in the car playing video games on the integrated DVDs, gorging on chips that are crumbling to the floor, as his kids dutifully run Dust Buster beneath his feet. As two parents who really, um, take the finish off things yet have mysteriously raised two budding neat freaks, this dissolves me into giggles.

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  9. Oh, and being the spoiled jerk that I am, my current biggest regret is that I didn’t get the touring class Odyssey. Seriously, if you’re in the Swagger Wagon market and you can afford it, do it.

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  10. “I used to ride home from school with the neighbor. He’d take 6 kids and himself in a standard sized pick-up. He’d let his youngest sit on his lap and steer.”
    We used to fit 7+driver in a VW bug. 2 in the passenger seat (one on a lap), 3 in the back seat, and 2 in the back storage area, sitting with their backs against the side of the car. I also once drove from Tennesee to Ohio in the back of a pickup truck.
    But the laws have put those days far behind us. I think there’s enormous value in packing more people into a single car, though, an oft missed fact in thinking about mileage.

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  11. My mom drew the line at having a kid in her lap while driving, though. She’s short, though and couldn’t have seen over a reasonably sized child’s head. Perhaps we should have suggested she sit in a child’s lap. Her visibility might have been better.

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  12. PPS: The reason the doors are amazing is the power doors. In the old days, it was a pain to try to slam a minivan door shut (no leverage). But now, they operate with power. So, the kids can open and close the doors themselves, and you don’t have to worry about fingers smashed in doors.

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  13. We drive this minivan, the Sienna. (We looked into the Odyssey, but this fit our needs better.) We bought it after we had our forth child. A nice Subaru station-wagon worked fine for us up through two children; once we had a third, we had to cut short some of our longer drives, but we could make it work. But of course that was impossible with four. With the Sienna, we could get back in the game of long drives. 800 miles to Caspar, Wyoming? We can do it in a day!
    Like MH, I have mixed memories about our years of growing up, riding in the back of pick-ups (did it all the time), all us kids scrambling around in the back seats of our monster Suburban, no seat belts in sight. There were a few close calls in those years, but no serious injuries. In these days where you are obliged by law to force your kids to sit in one place for 12 hours at a stretch, with only breaks when you stop for lunch or whatever, I sometimes regret the loss of that more relaxed attitude. No wonder everybody is addicted to video games and playing with their phones; they’re the only freedom of movement allowed to kids on long trips these days.

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  14. We had a full-sized van when I was little. It had four real chairs and the back was a bench seat (convertable into a bed) with a sign that said “Not to be occupied while vehicle is in motion.” Dad installed seatbelts himself and we crossed the country in that. The strict rule was you had to be buckled in the jerry-rigged seat belt at all times, unless you wanted to lie down or move around. He also rigged a stand for the cooler so that it was accessible, but wouldn’t go flying on a quick stop.

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  15. For one of our cross-country trips, my dad rigged up a television set, and wired it to an antenna that we’d stick on the roof when we stopped in a park or wherever for the night. We’d flop down the seats of that old Suburban and play Monopoly or whatever, all while Dad was pushing the speed limit down I-90.

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  16. My dad had a Pontiac Bonneville convertible when I was a kid. (Looked like this, but turquoise blue.) My sister and I would get into the hammock created by the cloth convertible roof when it was folded down, over the trunk, and we’d ride in the car that way. I can’t tell you how often we fell asleep on long trips.
    Good times.

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  17. We drive this minivan, the Sienna. (We looked into the Odyssey, but this fit our needs better.)
    I’m very curious about this! We looked at both and found them almost indistinguishable — the Honda dealer offered a grand more on our trade in, otherwise we’d still probably be trying to decide between them…

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