14 thoughts on “Little Samson

  1. My (parochial) school forbid the boys from having hair below the collar. I can’t recall any of us minding. The rule we really didn’t like was the “no jeans,” but in retrospect I kind of like that one. One guy did complain that they also banned facial hair, but that was pretty much just him since most of us couldn’t grow thick facial hair at that age.

  2. You probably also didn’t mind that your parochial school made you pray to god (assuming that they did). But, I would have.
    This kid’s school is public, and I’m just amazed that they’re keeping out of school because of that neat ponytail/bun (compared, to, say the wild mess that my daughter’s hair is in).
    Ugh.

  3. I’m surprised that a public school is making and enforcing a rule of this nature, but I am happy to let the voters of a Dallas school district govern said district, while the voters of New York govern New York’s school districts.
    (Sad to say, the school boards of New York City have not, historically, been petty tyrants, they have been penny-ante crooks.)

  4. “I am happy to let the voters of a Dallas school district govern said district, while the voters of New York govern New York’s school districts.”
    I’m not, ’cause I see this as a personal liberty issue. Presumably, they would need to make an exception for a sikh boy, and, if they do, I see no reason why they shouldn’t make an exception for this one as well.
    (mind you, my one exception is that I do think schools should be able to forbid face coverings that prevent a student from being identified, even if they are worn for religious reasons).

  5. PS: What else should Dallas be able to force their public school students to do? can they require that the girls wear bras? and when? and how about girdles, or stockings?

  6. This is not terribly unusual in the South, though it is getting rarer. My exurban public high school (88-92) also had draconian codes regarding hair, earrings, lengths of skirts, shorts and sleeves, logos and symbols on clothing, and probably a lot of other things I don’t remember. As I recall, the ban on then-trendy peace signs and restrictions on men’s earrings and hair were regarded as the most onerous by students.
    Checking this year’s student handbook, it looks like nothing has changed (pp. 25-26).

  7. My son’s private school has quite a few long-haired boys. The hair must be cut so that the face can be seen. It’s not a big deal, and most boys grow out of the thrill. By the end of middle school, most of them cut their hair to standard lengths. It’s easier to take care of shorter hair.
    I agree with the parents. A child’s hair is not “distracting.” It’s silly to use public resources to try to force a 4 year old to conform with the principal’s idea of the proper grooming for little boys.

  8. “Presumably, they would need to make an exception for a sikh boy…”
    I was thinking about that, actually.
    I was talking to a TX mom and her tween kids a month or so ago, and they have similar rules at their suburban public school. It seemed like the rules on hair length applied just to boys, although some girl in a nearby community had gotten on the news recently after the school took exception to her going full-Goth.
    Our kids are go to private school and wear uniforms and are too small for personal expression issues, so I don’t really think about this stuff. I do have to devote a fair amount of mental energy to thinking about what the uniform rules are on particular days. For C here’s the schedule: Monday, everyday uniform with black Mary Janes; Tuesday, chapel dress with tennis shoes (plus pack PE clothes); Wednesday, everyday uniform with black Mary Janes; Thursday, everyday uniform with tennis shoes (plus pack PE clothes); Friday, jeans and school spirit t-shirt with tennis shoes. With two kids of different genders, special holiday program dress, and all the seasonal variations, it’s pretty hard to keep things straight.

  9. Rules meant to enforce arbitrarily adopted gender norms make me crazy. There is nothing inherently distracting about long hair, or else the girls would be made to cut theirs as well. I think schools should be encouraging individual expression, not squashing it. And while the long hair issue is a fairly superficial one, it’s part of a set of norms that include ideas like “girls aren’t good at math.”
    When I did a long-term sub gig, it made me nuts that homeroom teachers were supposed to enforce the no short skirt rule (though I refused to report girls for it)–but what made me truly outraged was that cheerleaders wearing their uniform skirts to school were exempt. That made no sense.

  10. I’d like to note that Taylor’s very cute, looks healthy and well-cared for, and a dead ring for Harold (of purple crayon fame.)

  11. Any institution, church or school that requires short hair (not dressing appearence), aren’t supposed to be “serious” enough; they simply reflect the level that westly culture, with its inheritance from slaveness from capitalism and industrial revolution, have reached. These standards related to “hair lengh” on children, are different from dress codes, ’cause it reflects something that can “softly” deprive them from freedom and the power of alienation, whereas the clothe itself, doesn’t have such symbolism. Hair is a symbol of freedom and self instructive condition. If any parent agrees with such standard, they are as alienated as those “false” educators.

  12. Any institution, church or school that requires short hair (not dressing appearence), aren’t supposed to be “serious” enough; they simply reflect the level that westly culture, with its inheritance from slaveness from capitalism and industrial revolution, have reached. These standards related to “hair lengh” on children, are different from dress codes, ’cause it reflects something that can “softly” deprive them from freedom and the cleverness that could help them to avoid the power of alienation, whereas the clothe itself, doesn’t have such symbolism. Hair is a symbol of freedom and self instructive condition. If any parent agrees with such standard, they are as alienated as those “false” educators.

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