Where and Who is Conservative?

Richard Posner at the Posner-Beckett blog write about the decline of the conservative intellectual. Posner writes,

The end of the Cold War, the collapse of the Soviet Union, the surge of
prosperity worldwide that marked the global triumph of capitalism, the
essentially conservative policies, especially in economics, of the
Clinton administration, and finally the election and early years of the
Bush Administration, marked the apogee of the conservative movement.
But there were signs that it had not only already peaked, but was
beginning to decline. Leading conservative intellectual figures grew
old and died (Friedman, Hayek, Jeanne Kirkpatrick, Buckley, etc.) and
others as they aged became silent or less active (such as Robert Bork,
Irving Kristol, and Gertrude Himmelfarb), and their successors lacked
equivalent public prominence, as conservatism grew strident and
populist.

… it is notable that the policies of the new conservatism are powered
largely by emotion and religion and have for the most part weak
intellectual groundings. That the policies are weak in conception, have
largely failed in execution, and are political flops is therefore
unsurprising … By the fall of 2008, the face of the Republican Party
had become Sarah Palin and Joe the Plumber. Conservative intellectuals
had no party.

Nate Silver sees an increase in the number of voters with post-graduate degrees who vote for the Democratic ticket.

And great graphs from the Monkey Cage about where the white vote went in the last election. Looks like conservative voters are more likely to be white (non-Hispanic), wealthy, and Southern. I suppose that's not entirely surprising, but it's lovely to see it all mapped out and to see the variance between economic brackets.

10graphs2008income

4 thoughts on “Where and Who is Conservative?

  1. “… it is notable that the policies of the new conservatism are powered largely by emotion and religion and have for the most part weak intellectual groundings. ”
    That’s the Protestants. Lately, I’m shifting to become less Republican and more Catholic without becoming less conversative on anything but economic issues. By ‘less conservative’ on economic issues, I mean less free-market. In the sense of fearing innovation and resisting change, I’ve become more conservative on economic issues (which I imagine is very common right now).

  2. I hope people get more conservative, fiscally. America needs to not create a society of over spenders and over extenders.

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