Question of the Day — Longer School Day

We briefly talked about Obama's proposal for a longer school day a few days ago. 

I told Jonah about this idea yesterday. He mouth dropped open in horror. He said nothing, but you could see that he was rethinking his very vocal support for Obama during the last election.

Question of the Day: Do you like the idea of a longer school day? Do you think that it would make your kids smarter? Would the benefits outweigh the necessarily increases in taxes?

50 thoughts on “Question of the Day — Longer School Day

  1. I would like a longer school day with more recess and more activities like art/music/phys ed. Hell, just going to 3:30 would make me happy. Ask Jonah if he would like a longer school day if it meant an extra recess.
    This is not the place, but I’ll throw it here anyway: skipping grades. I read an article that observed that skipping grades is a great way to deal with gifted kids. Instead of paying for 12 years of education, you’re paying for 10 or 11 years, for one thing. Plus the kids can get the more challenging work they need.
    I was skipped a grade (2nd, coincidentally, which is E’s grade now) with no ill effects, but I was one of the older kids in the grade. I’ve thought about proposing it for E, but he is one of the youngest in his grade.

    Like

  2. For poor kids whose parents want it, not for my kids. On the other hand, I’d go for an extra half hour of school if it meant the end of homework. Or even longer if there were built-in activities for older children from 4PM to 5PM. My four-year-old is beat and pretty grumpy by the end of his full day (from 8:15 to pick up at 3:30), and he only goes three days a week. From what he says, I think he has a good time, but he just doesn’t have much more to give.
    The thing is, you really only have a couple good hours in the mornings when minds are fresh enough to tackle tough new material. In elementary school, from lunch on, it’s babysitting time. Hence the German practice of sending the kiddies home for lunch.

    Like

  3. If the school day ran until 4:30 or 5:00 and included homework time and an hour of exercise, I would be a huge, huge fan. We have weight problems with one kid in our house, and trying to get her enough exercise between 5:30 and 7:30 p.m., wedged in between dinner and homework and with the sun already down much of the year, it’s just impossible. (Currently her school day ends at 3; she goes to after-school care until 4:30 where they play but can opt out of physical activity if they choose — which she does, every time.)
    I would also be a big fan of an overall lengthened school year, with just 4-6 weeks off in the summer.

    Like

  4. Depends on the age of the child- but for my child up until high school she was already so drained at the end of the day this would have been a lousy idea. Even with the tradeoff of less/no homework. She gets overly stimulated by the noises and social demands of the school environment. She needs the time to decompress away from all the other students. YMMV.

    Like

  5. Yeah, and then NO WAY. Right, RC? I understand totally. When I was teaching, I was so burned out by the second week in May, I was counting the days until break.
    Hey, guys. Give me your input. I might enter this contest and this will be the column. http://bit.ly/2me4QF/

    Like

  6. I don’t want a longer school day. But, I feel like I’ve reorganized life to account for the shorter school day. I remember that it was something of a transition shock when we switched our daughter from her preschool/day-care to K. Dealing with the multiple days off, shortened school day (and, even though our school has reliable extended day care on campus, it was used infrequently enough by her friends, that using it would make her lonely) was a shock. But, we transitioned, and now we have a schedule that depends on a shorter school day, and a variety of activities that would not fit well into a school day.

    Like

  7. Oh, and we like homework around here. It’s what keeps us in the loop about what our daughter is learning, and opens conversations. But, her homework isn’t tedious. Its even frequently clever.
    This week, as examples, she was asked to find and then explain an editorial cartoon & to add up all the numbers between 1 & 100. Both of these homework sets started interesting conversations in our house. Now, she has the slate editorial cartoons & horsely cartoons bookmarked on her computer, and we’ve discussed Google’s book-scanning plan and the swine flu. And, we’ve remembered what you can learn from sum(i=1:n) = 0.5*n*(n+1).

    Like

  8. I don’t want this to sound mean, but it seems a bit like we’re hoping for the school to manage the things we have difficulty getting our children to do (be it homework, or exercise, or whatever activity it’s difficult for us to teach them). In this group, at least, people seem to be advocating for a longer school day for that purpose.
    I think it serves the same role for disadvantaged kids, that school take over for the things parents are unable to teach. But, in our case, the individual needs of each of our children is likely to be variable enough (i.e. exercise, executive skills, homework, . . . .) that trying to get the school to do it wouldn’t help us.
    And, we have the exercise issue around here — it’s a tough one, but we’ve come to the conclusion that in order to keep our daughter physically active, we have to enroll her in formal physical activity classes.

    Like

  9. On the contest, go for it. On the school day, the younger kids can only sit so long before they snap. For the older kids, a longer day would kill sports, drama and after school jobs. That said, I’m for cutting down summer to a month or two.

    Like

  10. “Hey, guys. Give me your input. I might enter this contest and this will be the column. http://bit.ly/2me4QF/
    Ooh, totally, you should enter. I don’t have any very helpful advise to give on a “short opinion essay” but I think you have people who could.
    If you’re considering the longer school day as your opinion piece, though, I feel like that issue has been popping up all over the place (on at lest 3 different boards/mailing lists I read) and lacks freshness.

    Like

  11. I’d like to see a day that goes until 4:30ish, but I don’t want it to start until 8:30ish or 9:00. In other words, I think that it needs to coordinate with the typical work schedule more. 7 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. is a nightmare for most working parents. If the schedule coincides with work schedules, it’d be easier to juggle the day–one parent could do the send off, the other the pick up–and I’m willing to bet that most lower income families are either in single-parent situations or dual income situations where parent schedules and kid schedules collide. Around here, they offer after care through grade 5 and there are sports and other clubs in high school until 5:30, but middle school? My son did sports for one season, and the rest of the year was a struggle to keep him occupied and on task. If there are activities available after school outside of the school, I’m unaware of them.
    Basically, I think schools need to deal with the fact that most kids have both parents working and adjust accordingly. A shifted schedule, more time during the year is probably more beneficial for the parents than for the kids, but not without benefits for the kids. Plus, it’s probably a benefit in and of itself to have less stressed out parents.

    Like

  12. Laura,
    True, I don’t want longer semesters. But truth be told, our semesters are so short that by all rights they should be longer. It amazes me that at the high price of private universities, there isn’t more consumerism around this issue. Sometimes it seems like the more you pay, the less you get–in actual class time. I suspect this will change before I reach retirement. Especially since last time I dared open by retirement statement, it appeared that I will never be able to retire.
    You’ll probably be of mixed mind about this, Laura, when you are paying college tuition! 🙂

    Like

  13. It’s pretty clear that longer school days and longer school years would help the vast majority of kids — the ones who watch the average number of hours of TV (4?), the ones who read the average number of books (0?), the ones who get the average amount of time outside in nature … it goes on and on.
    The fact that most of the comments so far come from folks who prefer the current arrangement tell you more about our particular sets of family resources than anything else.
    That having been said, we don’t spend enough time outside as it is: no way would I want the school day any longer. But summer could be shorter by a couple of weeks without registering either way for us. We’d take one fewer family trips — but the world should not be organized based on the flexibility of academics.

    Like

  14. By the way, where’s the drumbeat against collective choice here? Middle-class parents who can fill their kids’ after-school hours with extra-curricular activities, meaningful homework help, and other enrichment — and who oppose the cost that additional regimented classroom hours would have on their kids’ creativity or energy levels — are making it much, much harder for poor families to provide their children with the educational structure those kids need to succeed.

    Like

  15. Middle-class parents who can fill their kids’ after-school hours … are making it much, much harder for poor families to provide their children with the educational structure those kids need to succeed.
    I’m abandonding the public school system out of altruism.

    Like

  16. “I’m abandonding the public school system out of altruism.”
    Hey, I was going to say that. But, my argument in favor of altruism is supported by the fact that I’ll always vote to raise my taxes in order to support the public schools.

    Like

  17. It was an obvious joke.
    I’d vote against school taxes if we ever had a meaningful vote. The average teacher makes more than me (gross) and pays hundreds a month less than I do for insurance and retirement. And, enrollment is down something like 30%, so they could cut a lot of fat before ratios started to look bad.

    Like

  18. What Jody said.
    I don’t want my kids away from home any longer than they already are. I want them outside with lots of unstructured activity and optimal family time.
    But if I were working, I’d be all over longer school days and shorter summers. Afterschool childcare and summer camps are a nightmare for most people to schlep together, or even afford.

    Like

  19. My older kid goes to aftercare for an hour or two anyway, but I am just as happy to have that time unstructured. To hark back to the executive function posts, I am pretty well convinced that kids need lots of free play to learn well, and they’re not going to do that if they’re in structured activities every daylight hour.
    Also, I thought the evidence was not that middle-class kids were getting an edge because of targeted enrichment activities, but because their day-to-day lifestyle provided more learning moments and language enrichment. e.g. the stats about how many more words and concepts middle-class kids both passively heard and were actively exposed to by their middle-class parents. More school structure and time tries to compensate for that, but probably doesn’t.

    Like

  20. Middle-class parents who can fill their kids’ after-school hours with extra-curricular activities, meaningful homework help, and other enrichment — and who oppose the cost that additional regimented classroom hours would have on their kids’ creativity or energy levels — are making it much, much harder for poor families to provide their children with the educational structure those kids need to succeed.
    So we should accept mediocrity for our kids so kids with fewer family resources could potentially do better? I know my kids are better off having lots of free time (I wish I could send them to school half-days!) and are less curious and less happy when they’re in school more. Seems like an optional longer day would be more cost-effective and better able to meet the needs of more kids.

    Like

  21. It also depresses me that the kids who “need help” end up with more and more regimentation. Even if it works, is it worth stealing childhood?

    Like

  22. I have a 4 y.o. and a 6 y.o. who both went to an expensive Montessori program for full-time daycare, when my son started kindergarten last year we took the money we were saving in his tuition and hired a part-time nanny (who also folds laundry & other light housekeeping) to pick up 4 y.o. at Montessori and meet 6 y.o. at the bus stop. This has worked out really well for us, the kids have 2.5 hours a day to play together and just relax in their own home, I come home to a tidy house and happy kids.

    Like

  23. In the setting of real school choice, I’d have no objections to a longer school day. If parents could choose, schools would be forced to put the extra time to good use. In the current public school setting, no thanks! My kids in public schools watched more than enough movies during class time. If the schools aren’t using the very long current school day, I decline to believe that they’ll be more efficient with more time.
    You want homework to come home. When homework does not come home, it’s a bad sign. Yes, maybe they’re being very efficient, and maybe it won’t harm your child. Maybe. More likely, homework not coming home allows them to conceal the lack of content and progress in the classroom. If they’re doing their homework during class, that means they’ve just effectively cut the amount of instruction time in half. That’s an argument to change schools, not to leave your child in their care for even longer stretches of time.
    It is not true that other countries spend more time in school. I also refuse to regard the Asian cram system as a system worth emulating. There’s a reason such a huge number of South Korean students leave the country for school. We have a relative who just entered university in Germany. Until the 4th grade, she got out of school at 11. A.M. She then had two to three hours of homework.
    It’s the work ethic which makes the difference. If you require students to spend more time in school, you will rob them of the ability to choose to spend their time wisely. You will rob them of the opportunity to practice completing homework alone.

    Like

  24. I came here to say no, for sure–but some of the comments above are interesting. A longer school day if it included a real recess, with outdoor play? If it included art AND music instead of either a choice between them or neither? Maybe. But I’d like the day to start later (especially for high-school–here that starts before 8 am, which doesn’t suit most of their biorhythms). And if it were a choice between a longer year and a longer day, I’d go for the longer year, with longer breaks in between and not that ridiculous 2.5 month stretch in the summer.

    Like

  25. I agree. I wouldn’t necessarily want to extend the school year, but changing the school calendar makes sense. Giving more frequent 2-week vacations, and breaking up the summer, would make sense.

    Like

  26. How about families with 2 working parents? Teachers/professors don’t count. Any readers here fit that description? Wouldn’t parents that fit that description be very in favor of a longer school day/year?

    Like

  27. Here’s the thing: my husband and I have already created a longer school day and school year for our kids. We’ve had no choice, as we can’t be with them. So we sign them up for before-school and after-school activities that handle the transition for us; we put them in expensive camps on school closure days and over the summer.
    There seems to be this feeling that if the school day/year is lengthened, it will lead to less family time and less unstructured time. For most of us, that’s not happening anyway! So let’s stop bemoaning “stealing childhood” and at least make it easier and more affordable for everyone.

    Like

  28. “If they’re doing their homework during class, that means they’ve just effectively cut the amount of instruction time in half.”
    I disagree. It’s a kind of instructional strategy to have students do work with the teacher supervising them while they do it. If parents cannot supervise homework (and many can’t), then it’s much better for students to do their homework where they can ask questions during the process than to do it at home or in afterschool care all alone.
    “How about families with 2 working parents? Teachers/professors don’t count. Any readers here fit that description? Wouldn’t parents that fit that description be very in favor of a longer school day/year? ”
    It’s crazy how few of these families I know. 😦 Lots of layoffs in my area, so one parent is home, lots of SAH or part-time-working moms. Of my 3 sisters, one is a teacher, one is married to a teacher, and one is SAH (insurance settlement from a car accident provides steady income source).

    Like

  29. In comparison to 45 minutes of instruction, 20 minutes of instruction and 25 minutes of homework doesn’t cut it. “If parents cannot supervise homework (and many can’t)…” Well, parents shouldn’t be deeply involved in homework. There should be homework, however. For a teacher, preparing for a 20 minute class, and spot tutoring, is much less labor intensive than preparing for a 45 minute class, and then correcting the homework the students do on his own. We’ve had kids in both systems. Not surprisingly, the student who had 2-3 hours of work to do each night made much more progress. In part, that’s because he’s had much more effective instruction.
    ” So let’s stop bemoaning “stealing childhood” and at least make it easier and more affordable for everyone.”
    Er–who do you think will pay for this, if not two-career professional couples? The federal goverment’s in the red. The states are running massive deficits. There isn’t enough money, at present, in my town and state, to support our current school system. We are looking at enormous cuts in basic educational services. Extending the school day for convenience’s sake isn’t in the cards. The schools are not babysitting services. That’s what they’d become, in the best case, under the current economic conditions.
    And things will get worse. The baby boomers have only begun to retire. I’ve been worrying about the government being able to afford even basic educational services, given the stresses the retirement of the BBs will cause. Double that worry to reflect the added burden of the extreme losses in retirement funds and house values.

    Like

  30. I can see that a longer school day would be better for some children.
    I would prefer not to make it normal.
    I went to Plain schools, one of the genuinely odd working models of schooling. (Not odd, so much as anachronistic.) Three hours instructional time a day, 150 days a year. Very little homework (maybe an hour a day for the very slowest students.) I think that’s a very good model.

    Like

  31. “How about families with 2 working parents? Teachers/professors don’t count. Any readers here fit that description? Wouldn’t parents that fit that description be very in favor of a longer school day/year? ”
    That’s us, so apparently not!
    Jen, our aftercare is pretty unstructured. It’s not running free around the neighborhood, obviously, but it’s not two extra hours of instructional time, either.

    Like

  32. So, why the difference between jen and Marya. Do some people have better experiences with before and after care? I’ve heard lots of complaints about after care programs, both because of the cost and the lack of supervision.
    My kids are coming home at 2:45 now. When I was working at a traditional job, this was a huge problem. I don’t have access to after care for my special needs kid. It was really difficult to find someone capable of helping w/homework, making dinner, and driving to soccer games. But now that I’m working untraditional hours, it’s been fine. I’ve been doing all sorts of projects with the kids. Jonah was asking me all sorts of questions about plants the other day, so we could spontaneously look up facts on the Internet.

    Like

  33. I never said anything about not paying for a longer school day. I’m already paying thru the nose for all kinds of stuff — frankly I would be happier spending for programs that all kids could participate in, instead of throwing money at the many boutique camps and after-school activities. I dislike how the kids end up so rigorously self-sorted by income due to the cost of these private after-school activities.

    Like

  34. “frankly I would be happier spending for programs that all kids could participate in, instead of throwing money at the many boutique camps and after-school activities. I dislike how the kids end up so rigorously self-sorted by income due to the cost of these private after-school activities.”
    Good point, jen. But do you think that why there hasn’t been huge public support for a longer school day? Parents like being able to give their kids that special camp or the fancy soccer class. They like that they can control a portion of their kids’ day and they like that they give their kid something extra. Not everybody is as egalitarian as you.

    Like

  35. Probably true that I’m more egalitarian than many, although remember — my kids are getting sorted both in and out of things. Sometimes I can afford to send them to the things their friends go to, sometimes not. We’re not the brokest family in the class but also not the wealthiest. So the “sorting line” passes on either side of us, depending.
    In any case, I don’t think any of this stuff explains how the school day has ended up so short. Schools are broke and cutting hours and non-core programs saves them money. And teachers’ unions are against extending the day/year. End of story as far as I can see.

    Like

  36. “frankly I would be happier spending for programs that all kids could participate in, instead of throwing money at the many boutique camps and after-school activities.”
    Here’s a question: do you sign your kids up for city programs now? They’re usually dirt cheap.
    “Parents like being able to give their kids that special camp or the fancy soccer class. They like that they can control a portion of their kids’ day and they like that they give their kid something extra.”
    One thing I actually like about the summer is that it means that I can customize the time to my child’s actual needs. She needs to learn to swim–two weeks of 45-minute lessons with the Red Cross. She needs to do physical therapy–twice a week appointments, no sweat. During the school year, unless we’re homeschooling, we’re mostly pounding our kids into pre-drilled holes. On the other hand, during the summer, it’s possible to think about the child’s individual needs and meet them.

    Like

  37. I do sometimes sign the kids up for city of Chicago stuff; the park district has stepped up in a big way in terms of providing programs for kids. DD #1 currently takes tennis thru the park district. Capacity is really the biggest issue; the slots are hard to get.
    I’m all for choosing among various programs that suit my kids’ interests, when I can. I guess my thing is this: the school buiding is already there, the *kids* are already there, the programs are needed. How exactly is it better to make me pick them up, drive them 10 minutes to a private dance studio, and sit in the waiting room for an hour while they do their thing? This prevents me from working a full-time job (with all the risk associated with that choice) and doesn’t accomplish anything more than a slightly extended day at school with a real gym teacher. From an efficiency perspective I just don’t get it.
    At our particular school at interesting phenomenon has been occurring: external vendors have started giving after-school classes right in the building. They pay a space usage fee to the school, which the school loves. Participants pay an extra fee. But otherwise it occurs just like an additional class – you pick your kid up after their end-of-day activity. This is how my kids currently take piano and art. There’s a science club on Fridays, and dance on Tuesdays. To me, this seems like a great compromise — except for the constant, obvious sorting based on parents’ income.
    I look at this and I think, our school day is already extended, and without it my husband could not have rejoined the work force. It works great for us. So when Laura asks, what do you guys think of an extended day, I can’t help but respond, that’s a good idea and let’s at least make it fair. This is all I’m saying.
    Perhaps the at-home parents in this group would be more open to the extended day if it were organized in a way that made it optional. If you could pull your kid at 3:30 before gym class at your discretion, maybe that would make it more amendable to folks.

    Like

  38. Thanks, guys, this has been really helpful. I’ve been working on this article all morning. Did some interviews and everything. I think my punchline is that most middle class people are satisfied with the status quo. They like the control. Their kids are going to good colleges. They don’t have the summer skill lag. My working class working parents friends are wildly in favor of this plan, but the middle class working parents aren’t. Pilot programs in urban areas financed by federal funds would probably work best.

    Like

  39. “At our particular school at interesting phenomenon has been occurring: external vendors have started giving after-school classes right in the building.”
    My daughter did ballet last year at her school in a similar program. Of course, she needed lots of help getting in and out of ballet gear and getting her hair presentable. Around here, I’ve heard some moms refer to the head of that program as “the ballet Nazi.” My husband and I are planning to start a once-a-month board game club in October. I wouldn’t mind doing it more often, but we are testing the waters. I’d also eventually like us to do some sort of competitive math or science club.

    Like

  40. In our state, public schools have been making their budgets by dint of adding fees for activities, such as the right to ride the school bus, or participate in after school sports or music programs. My husband and I have publicly objected to this creeping privatization of the public system, but no one understands our objections. I see a two-class system growing in the public schools, and the most entitled parents see nothing wrong with a system which gives their kids a leg up.
    Our school has also started to offer after school classes, some from vendors, and some from teachers. This only increases the sorting by income.
    I would not object to a system of independent, publicly funded charter schools, for example, which had the freedom to experiment with different structures for the day. One school might have shortened school days, with no sports or arts electives, for those children who are pursuing intensive preparation in sports or music. Another might have extended school days for those families who need the services.
    For a time, our affluent suburban school had an after school “homework club.” Our test scores rose, and a certain number of students took part. By no means did all the students take part, and I believe the program’s been discontinued. There is a deep resistance to spending “too much” time at school.

    Like

  41. “In our state, public schools have been making their budgets by dint of adding fees for activities, such as the right to ride the school bus…”
    Holy cow. I can’t believe that one would stand up in court, unless it was an out-of-boundary family.

    Like

  42. “Thanks, guys, this has been really helpful. I’ve been working on this article all morning. ”
    Good luck Laura. I’d love to read you at the Wash Post, and promise to do so religiously if you get to the next step.

    Like

  43. blog copy of a Globe article on activity fees: http://hwsos.org/wordpress/articles/paying-to-play-articles-from-the-boston-globe-north-published-8242008/beyond-sports-activity-fees-too/
    Bus and activity fees: http://www.boston.com/news/local/massachusetts/articles/2009/05/21/drawing_the_line_at_fees_to_ride_bus_play_sports/
    Our district, and probably many others, depends upon fees to make the budget each year. I suspect, in my cynical heart, that many parents don’t mind it, because the additional cost serves to edge out their children’s competitors. Certain families won’t be able to afford a sport for each child, and bus service, and high school activities.

    Like

  44. Aren’t the bus fees only if you live within the walking area? That’s how it works in Richmond IIRC, and what it sounds like in the article.

    Like

  45. [quote]I guess my thing is this: the school buiding is already there, the *kids* are already there, the programs are needed. How exactly is it better to make me pick them up, drive them 10 minutes to a private dance studio, and sit in the waiting room for an hour while they do their thing? This prevents me from working a full-time job (with all the risk associated with that choice) and doesn’t accomplish anything more than a slightly extended day at school with a real gym teacher. From an efficiency perspective I just don’t get it.
    [/quote]
    Yeah, I get that. On-site would sure be nice. That’s what they would do if they were in boarding school, right? Move on to school-sponsored free time and recreation.
    If we didn’t have special ed, we’d have the option to have afterschool program at our home school. (The transportation doesn’t work out.)
    What we have doesn’t have much to do with “quality” and “enrichment”–I guess some parents might call it warehousing. It works for us for now. I really am serious about not wanting her to have extra structured activities right now, just free play. However, she’s only 6 and I will probably feel differently in a few years.

    Like

  46. One thing I’m not sure how to balance: if a family chooses to make the sacrifice to have a stay-home parent, how to honor that decision while still providing appropriate support for the working families? Keep the school day short and allow for max flexibility for after-school, and the working parents blow a gasket and some kids are left out. Lengthen the school day and provide on-site programs, and the at-home parents must feel like, why exactly did I stay home again? And when do I get to see my kids? Still haven’t figured that one out.

    Like

  47. SamChevre, each town decides independently, within the framework of state laws. Our town began with fees for all school children who lived within two miles of school. As our town is small, and circular, that was the majority of children. It was difficult keeping track of who had paid, and who hadn’t paid.
    They then switched to charging all 7th & 8th graders a larger fee to ride the 5th-8th grade bus. As the buses would cover the same route, this amounts to refusing to allow the poor(er) kids to ride the bus. Also consider the environmental impact–roughly half the parents don’t pay the fee, and they all drive their kids to school in the morning. It’s added hundreds of unnecessary trips to the system.
    Our town has shown flexibility, in that it’s allowed parents to add programs at school, at their own cost. The sentiment seems to be, “if they want it, they should pay for it.” There isn’t any support for an expansion of the school program at taxpayer expense.

    Like

  48. The school where my sister’s kids attended charged for buses (they were not in walking distance), and also required that parents send in toilet paper, paper towels, etc, in addition to school supplies. There was also a charge for textbooks and materials, which I thought surely must be illegal. This is in Alabama.
    In one spectacular incident that landed my sister on the local evening news, her kids’ school charged fees for the students to wear their own clothes (normally they were required to wear uniforms, but the school designated certain “Patriot Days,” on which they could show their love of country by wearing their own red, white, and blue clothing and paying the school $5 for that privilege).

    Like

  49. Cant believe this! Im a kid! Kids shouldnt have to have to go to school longer, I mean, get with the program. Im familiar with half days and such. But people, us kids need breaks sometimes. I get like, 5-7 pages of homework (still not in middle school!) a week. I disagree with “the longer school day” wants. If you read this, I hope you understand what it feels like to be a kid in a world where adults think that education is more valuable than socialisim (is that a word?). Peace, Love, Music, Always yours, LadyGaga4Life.

    Like

Comments are closed.